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to bob dole because and many ways he is the poster boy for a new kind what i would argue is at least possibly a new kind of post senate career. first of all he's made a lot of money. i don't think there is -- bald told has made far more money than he would have ever possibly imagined. here is a guy who lived frugally russell kansas, lifetime public servant. and certainly was not seen as a big spender. had good congressional pension and then resign as a presidential candidate and starts appearing in television commercials. [laughter] down, boy. [laughter] >> what kind? >> pepsi i think it was, or maybe something you drink with pepsi. [laughter] second lead, he becomes a highly sought after partner in a prestigious law firms, the rainmaker of the first quarter. so he is rewarded tremendously at the end of the career. i don't think he calculated that particularly at all. here is a guy that wanted to be a good leader, desperately wanted to be president. but there he was in 1996. suddenly, bob dole has embarked upon any number of good works, has been a presidential envoy, has worked with
would do us the honor of joining us at your inaugural gown. . . >> staffers for former senator bob dole discussed his career. also the legacy of ronald reagan. then remarks from andrew sullivan about the politics of homosexual eddity. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >> today on "newsmakers", republican governor mitch daniels. he talks about the economic impact of the health care bill on indiana and on other states. >> we are continuing to discover new costs. it is not just the cost that will be visited on some future governor to pick up hundreds of thousands of new people on our medicaid system. we have already been hit with $25 million bill, because the government wants to confiscate pharmacy rebates. now they will take the benefit of that away starting immediately. we see administrative costs coming. when we have to supervise a huge expansion of medicaid and, as we understand it, shoulder the administrative costs of new exchanges. it will be of very expensive thing under any estimate for taxpayers in ever
is going to be the 50th anniversary of bob dole's election to the united states congress and are you guys planning anything? i said as a matter of fact we are. we are planning our presidential lecture series which is one of our signature series on that topic. and he proposed the idea of doing a conference that focuses on the senate, and it just fit perfectly, a perfect way to conclude the series. so we were very excited about that and very excited about what burdett has put together. one of the things we have heard in the course of the series consistently is that the united states senate needs more people like bob dole, like his career exemplifying bipartisanship, stability and a willingness while having strong philosophical beliefs, to reach across the aisle and try to work with others with different points of view. we heard from bob dole's biography. we have heard from members of his staff. we have heard from the first and until he recently retired only historian of the united states senate and finally we heard from one of his very prominent colleagues, former senator jack danforth. and
senator bob dole was first elected to congress 50 years ago and the participants talked about how the institution has evolved since then. this is about 90 minutes. >> good afternoon. we are delighted we have such an outstanding crowd out for what is going to be a fascinating conference over the next two days. we also want to thank all our visiting scholars for taking the time not to visit campus here and be part of this. those of you who have attended dole institute programs before know we are a hybrid facility. we have a museum, a very impressive archive with all of bob dole's papers and artifacts, and we conduct a very aggressive programming schedule that usually is focused on practitioners, but also try to do scholarly types conferences from time to time. last fall, a professor at loomis, who is not only a distinguished professor of political scientisce but a certifiable political junkie. he approached us with a very interesting idea. he said next year is going to be the 50th anniversary of bob dole's election to the united states congress. are you guys planning anything? >> i
] [inaudible conversations] >> coming up here on c-span2, text former aides to senator bob dole talk about his time in the senate. >> if you have a process where it takes years to get an answer and you're bogged down in the courts which is what is threatening our industry right now, that's not a good answer for everybody. and it doesn't make the agency effective. >> verizon vice president and former congressman tom tauke, tonight on the communicators on c-span2. >> let's meet another winner in c-span's studentcam documentary position. we ask students to tell us about one the greatest strength or challenge facing the country. today we talk to an 8th grader at independent day school in tampa, florida. ben, how's it going trade? >> good. >> thank you for joining us at c-span. you choice to do your documentary on hunger in the united states. why? >> well, normally they tell you the three things we need are food, shelter, and clothing, really the only thing you scientifically need to survive is food. a lot of people aren't getting as much as they should. >> how has hunger affected your community at
a very impressive archive with all of the bob dole's papers and artifacts. and we conduct a very, very aggressive programming schedule. that you do is focus on practitioners. but also we tried to do scholarly type conferences from time to time. last fall, professor burdett loomis who is not only a distinguished professor of political science, good friend of the dole institute, but, and this is required, to be involved sometimes at the go is if you, a certifiable political junkie. approached us about a very interesting idea that he said, you know, next year is going to be the 50th anniversary of bob dole's election to the diocese congress. are you guys planning anything? and i said as a matter of fact, we are. we're planning our presidential lecture series which is one of our signature series on that topic. and he proposed the idea of doing a conference that focuses on the senate. and it just fit perfectly, a perfect way to conclude the series. and so we were very excited about that and very excited about what bird put together. was the things we've heard over the course of the series c
-- awkwardness. i think senator dole gracefully avoided it, much to his credit. >> bob, did you have anything to add? >> arkansas remember that day vividly. it was a day of some sadness -- i remember that day vividly. there wasn't a majority leader quite like him. there have been some great majority leaders before and after, but he gave a moving speech. there wasn't a dry eye in the room. and that was a packed room top of the hart building, this cavernous place. >> it was true on the floor. both speeches, his last speech in the senate, as well as the speech acknowledging he made the decision to leave. both were remarkably graceful in his acknowledgment of the institution and the people with whom he had worked. >> let's talk about his leadership style. i never worked for him on the hill. i was on the hill in various roles some campaigns, seeing how he did things. one of the most amazing things i ever saw was how he would have the majority leader's office multiple meetings. he would circulate among them. tell us a little bit about how that were. >> he was a master of meetings. -- how that worke
later, i got a call from bob dole asking me to throw my hat into the ring for this job. i did, and i got the job. then, we started out with note files, no real information, and yet, reporters knew that we existed and that they started calling. they were asking how many senators had been convicted of a crime? who knows? [laughter] i put together a staff. none of this would have been possible without a terrific staff. we put that together over the years pipit my assistant is now the senate historian. he was one of the backbones of that operation. we went out and introduced ourselves to other government has durant. many people do not know that other agencies employ historians. we went out to find out what it is historians are supposed to do. we quickly learned that our responsibility was not so much to keep the history of environmental legislation in the senate, or name the subject. that is what the congressional research service at the library congress, with a staff of 800 experts, does. they are there to provide that kind of assistance to congress. our focus, we realized very quickly, was
was a direct result of bob dole. the creation of the coverage for the rural health clinics in rural locations from the country and medicare at all the time of the services and the sort of challenges faced by small rural hospitals was a direct result of bob dole. while we all acknowledge and celebrate the social security salvation cobra there was a whole series of those, there are also these other things for which he gets little credit but is directly responsible and had enormous impact on people's lives across this country. that is really something. >> i was just going to comment on the bottle and moynihan of relationship and how close that was. i can recall during the primary campaign of 1988 presidential campaign senator moynihan asked senator dole's permission to use his image and words in one of his campaign commercials of new york which he did which i thought was remarkable display of bipartisanship in the sort of illustrates their of the closest of the relationship. >> that relationship repeated itself in a situation similar to the social security situation of the way didn't play out as
interesting idea. you've said you know, next year is going to be the 50th anniversary of bob dole's election to the united states congress and are you guys planning anything? i said as a matter of fact we are. we are planning our presidential lecture series which is one of our signature series on that topic. and he proposed the idea of doing a conference that focuses on the senate, and it just fit perfectly, a perfect way to conclude the series. so we were very excited about that and very excited about what burdett has put together. one of the things we have heard in the course of the series consistently is that the united states senate needs more people like bob dole, like his career exemplifying bipartisanship, stability and a willingness while having strong philosophical beliefs, to reach across the aisle and try to work with others with different points of view. we heard from bob dole's biography. we have heard from members of his staff. we have heard from the first and until he recently retired only historian of the united states senate and finally we heard from one of his very prominen
, one of which was senator bob dole. mr. baker and senator dole shared a history together that began in 1987, when they partnered on a project celebrating the bicentennial of the united states senate. senator dole delivered a short historical vignettes highlighting memorable people, customs and defensive associated with the senate. -- and memorable events associated with the senate. these were later compiled and published as the historical almanac of the united states senate. mr. baker's devotion to history is evident. he maintained records, published histories, and kept photographs related to all activity. he worked to make that history more accessible to the american public through which content presented on the website, in a congressional office building, by appearing on c-span, and most importantly, through a tireless from senators, their staff, reporters, historians, student, and even a tourist visiting congress for the very first half congress for the very first half ti
majority leaders, five democrats, four republicans, one of which was senator bob dole. mr. baker and senator dole shared a history together that began in 1987, when they partnered on a project celebrating the bicentennial of the united states senate. senator dole delivered a short historical vignettes highlighting memorable people, customs and defensive associated with the senate. -- and memorable events associated with the senate. these were later compiled and published as the historical almanac of the united states senate. mr. baker's devotion to history is evident. he maintained records, published histories, and kept photographs re
and from a historical perspective. and no more appropriate place than the kind of home of bob dole. i think one thing that would likely emerge from this two-day conference is the idea that today's senate is something of a mess. and i think that's a widespread probably not universal view but a widespread view among both scholars and journalists and political observers. kind of combination of individualism, obstructionism and kind of intense nasty partisan warfare that together puts them together and makes it very difficult institution to govern. and a policy. now i think about what's wrong with today's senate, a lot of times, and especially journalists and political scientists look back to made century senate as a better time. the scent of the 1940s and 50s is institution that in some ways work well. got to be sure there are plenty of things wrong with the made century senate, so for example, people who often the southern democrats were filibustering and killing civil rights bills region in the 1940s and '50s. so distasteful aspects, but a lot of people point to the mid century senate, lyndo
that early in my career, i received a lot of mentoring from senator bob dole. i worked with fathers who had daughters and who had family situations where it was not expected for women to go out and work. i think many of them recognized the need to support young professional women. the do not think i would have gotten as much support if i -- i do not think i would have gotten as much support if i was not a woman. >> we want to get to all of the questions from the audience, as well as people online. let me to our state of the states before we get to that. christina, if you were talking to students coming out of school right now, what would you advise them? it is a tough economy. we all know that. what would be your advice for people today? >> i think we are on the road to recovery. i think we are a lot better off than we were a year ago. that was certainly a frightening time. i think the economy is growing again. it is still going to be a very tough job market for quite a while. that is the sad reality. i will put in a plug. i think we need to be doing as much as possible to make the unemploy
. and then the radio and tv correspondents dinner. >> three former staffers of former senator bob dole look at like a step -- legislation he sponsored. that is tomorrow at 11:00 a.m. eastern on c-span3 then, at 12:15 p.m., a look at the future of american culture that is tomorrow on c-span. this weekend, john dean is our guest. the author of 10 books, including an upcoming addition, and we will take your phone calls sunday, at noon eastern. >> and now, former congressman and current head of the national endowment for the humanities talks about understanding culture and the arts. he talks about his efforts to bring stability to public discourse this is moderated by the former head of the national endowment for the arts. the aspen institute is the host of this event. last about an hour -- it lasts about an hour. >> good afternoon. welcome to the aspen institute. i am the director of programs and the arts. it is my pleasure to welcome you to one of our cultural round tables. i would like to thank michelle smith for helping make this series possible. this series possible. it is my pleasure to do anothe
, it is by far the most republican region of the country, and whereas the northeast which 50 years ago when bob dole was first elected to the senate, the northeast was the most republican region of the country, and now it is by far the most, notwithstanding scott brown, it is the most by far the most democratic region of the country so we have seen a regional realignment began it reflects this underlying ideology that raises an important component but that is not the only issue that is produced that. but yeah, living in georgia, believe me, i am well aware of that. >> i believe we have time for a final question. right there. >> the voters now, six months later, respond by electing as the house minority leader on the house bill. the house bill that he said would he repealed. i cannot believe, and i would like to put each of the three of you what the result will be in terms of seats in the house. >> the results of the campaign for repeal? >> yes. >> well, first of all i think the democrats are certain to lose seats in congress in both, certainly in the house and almost certainly in the senate, an
it operated back in the 1950s and 60s when bob dole first entered the united states senate. i think it is fair to say is to start off, i think eric is absolutely correct that some of this view of of the senate at mid century in partisan conflict was minimal and a great deal of adherence to these norms is overstated. there is no question that the senate of the mid-20th century was a very, very different legislative body from the senate that we see today, and i would argue that the most important difference between the senate than in the senate now, because it relates to so many of the other changes taking place has been the rise and partisan polarization. that is the increasing ideological divide between the political parties so while they were ideological battles in the senate back in the 1940s and 1950s they didn't coincide to nearly the same extent as they do today with party lines. what we see today is that the party divide is much sharper than it was back in the 1950s and 60s. there is a handout that has figures and tables that illustrate these points. figure one shows the distribution of
by far the most republican region of the country and whereas the northeast which 50 years ago when bob dole was first elected to the senate to the northeast was the most republican region of the country and now it's by far notwithstanding scott brown is the most by far the most space region of the countries we have seen the regional realignment but again it reflects this underlying ideological limit. race is an important component. though that's not the only issue that has produced that. but jack, i mean, that's -- living in georgia believing i'm well aware of that. >> -- i believe we have time for a final question. right there. >> the voters now six months later respond by electing as the house minority leader of the house bill. the health bill he said would be repealed. i cannot believe that the -- i would like to ask each of you this result will be in terms of seats in the house. >> the results of the campaign for repeal? >> yes. >> first of all i think the democrats are certain to lose seats in congress and both certainly in the house and almost certainly in the senate and they cou
served under nine senate majority leaders, five democrats, for republicans, one of which was senator bob dole. mr. baker and senator dole share a history together that began in 1987 when they partner on a project celebrating the bicentennial of the united states senate. beginning on the first day of the 100th congress, senator dole delivered a short historical vignettes written by mr. baker and his staff highlighting the significant people, unusual customs, and memorable events associated with the senate over the first two centuries. mr. baker's devotion to history is evident in his building of the office, as the first to made great strides in protecting and maintaining records, recording oral histories, cataloging and reserving photographs that document now activities. not content to merely preserve history, mr. baker worked to make the history more acceptable -- accessible to the american public, through rich content, exhibits at the congressional office buildings, for appearances on c-span, and most importantly, a pair this devotion to answering questions from senators -- a tireless d
as an individual. i would like to begin by asking each of you to tell how you came about working per for bob dole in the various roles you have in his office. let's start with you. >> i came to work for senator dole in '79 when the senator goes to the position of ranking member of the senate finance committee replacing paul curtis and dole as elevated and i think the senator wanted to give some young warriors to help staff that committee and through elizabeth elizabeth called one of her classmates at cal for ten and birling and the bald and myself worked at covington and birling and i think that bob recommended us and came over as the republican staff director and i came over as the deputy director. i think bob was particularly a litigator was interested in having somebody there who understood the tax law so that is one of the areas that i practice in. >> what else did you go on to be so? kind of walk us through also chief of staff, right? >> i was a deputy staff character of finance then i became the chief counsel of staff director of the finance committee and then went senator was elected the m
bob dole has been hospitalized. he's undergoing extensive physical therapy after knee surgery. also preparing for surgery on his other knee done in chicago later nun. a spokesman tells fox news bob dole is doing great. good and bad news today for out of work americans. first the good news. labor department tells us business has added 162,000 jobs in march. some call it the first concrete sign of an economic recovery. the bad news the unemployment rate remains unchanged at 9.7%. eight million americans have lost their jobs since the recession began. president obama admits that is staggering. i'm marianne rafferty. >> greta: over and over you have heard about the so-called louisiana purchase. did senator mary landrieu make a backroom deal for her health care vote or so she being hammered unfairly? we report, you decide. i take it you don't use that reference to the provision in the health care reform bill. >> absolutely not. not only do i not like it it is a mischaracterization about what happened. it is not a special deal for me it is a fair deal for the people of louisiana. what hap
that i think senator dole gracefully avoided, much to his credit. >> bob, did you have anything to add? >> i remember that day vividly. it was a day of some sadness for me because i sort of thought and still think it was the passing of an error although there wasn't a majority leader quite like him. there hasn't been one since. that the great majority leader post before and after, but it was -- he gave a moving speech. there wasn't a dry eye in the room. and you know it was a packed room in the top of the heart elting. this great big cavernous place and everybody was moved. >> and it was true on the floor as well. again, both speeches, both his last speech in the united states senate as well as the speech acknowledging yet made a decision to leave were both remarkably graceful. and it's acknowledgment of the institution of the people with whom he had worked. >> let's talk about his leadership style. as the three of you know i never worked for him on the bill, but i was on the hill with various roles in the campaign seen how he did. and one of the most amazing things i saw rod, sheila a
expected to have several charges. >>> we're following a developing story. bob dole is in walter reed hospital tonight recovering from knee surgery and a bought from pneumonia. a spokesman says he's doing just fine. >>> more disturbing information of priest abuse came out. an arizona priest molested boys late back in the 70s. it called his behavior almost satanic. it took 12 years from the vatican to remove him from the priest hood. the pope has not addressed the scandal during this holy week but the archdiocese is speaking out and we get from from lindsey mastis. >> reporter: it may be good friday for catholics, but it's been a difficult week for the catholic church. >> it hurts. it's painful. people here are praying for the victims. >> reporter: the group gathered in front of saint matthew's cathedral. he says he was sexually abused while in the seminary. >> he was pulling my clothes off, holding my hands down. >> reporter: he then went onto abuse others, including an 8-year-old boy and a mentally disabled man. he died before going to trial in 2006. >> those who had the propensity t
to their base. it's unfortunate. you need leadership. the bob doles, that type of republican is not around any more. you need moderates within the republican party but not in leadership. and it sounds like nullification dripping off their lips. it's not the kind of language you need to bring together america. they talk about bipartisan ship, and then meeting at the state line, and these are not the words that you hear in congress. it's impossible to have bipartisanship when one party says no, no, no, and kill the bill. the whole idea of kill the bill was difficult. i was out on the balcony, and the verbiage was on the -- it was so strong you knew if they got -- they had ill feelings toward anybody that voted for the bill. tempers got so great. and it -- i had been to birmingham, montgomery with john lewis on the civil rights pilgrimages. we saw the bridge and we went there when the government tried to opress people that wanted to start civil rights. and this did not start with george bush and dick cheney that had the biggest deficit budgets ever. they did not care. and this does not make sense
to take the lead against bob dole and won't the election by 10 points. a president can always change the terms of his own presidency. it is like the old joke how many psychiatrists does it take to change a lightbulb? one if it really wants to change. who knows if obama really wants to change. >> greta: there seems to be a difference in terms of clinton presidency. president obama has so profoundly changed health care that you can turn that one around. there would have to be a new topic where he was an enormous hero this one doesn't seem to be one you can turn around. >> well, obviously, the most significant issue is the economy. obama takes the position that it went down sharply now it is going to go up sharply. i that i that v is the first part of a w where it guess down again. what will make or break his presidency is if republicans take control in 2010. they going to face this 1.4 trillion $deficit. obama is going to say raise taxes and they are going to say slash spending and that fight will determine the fate of the obama presidency. >> greta: we'll be watching and reading your
. >> oral histories, here is an excerpt from what you have done. it is bob dole talking about george mcgovern. we'll let you talk about what role they play. >> he had a very compassionate attitude. how else could you explain mcgovern? i used to rail against mcgovern and i cannot do that because i have such respect for him. it is a beautiful friendship. i sat down after the bill announcement when we had that big dinner. we had a late-night snack and george mcgovern came in and we sat down and talked for about an hour and a half. i just came to see that bob had more influence on him than he had on bob. >> where did you do it were to mark what we did it about three years ago. we missed jack kemp. he was a happy warrior. he was a man about ideas, principals. >> you did not have to agree with them, but he believed politics was supposed to be about ideas and not character assassination or trivial tactics of the moment. we could use more people like him. >> what is this project about? >> it was an oral history project. he did not want to be a biographical project, he wanted it to be about p
so that we could have tea for two. >> tefra was a remarkable solo performance by bob dole it off deal with exactly the problem that we find insurmountable now, which is dealing with the deficit. although at that time we had a huge deficit. and we had very high interest rates. and in the order of 18% interest rates. and dole and some other members of the finance committee met with paul volcker was the fed chair at the time. and he said if you pass a big package that cuts the deficit by a specified amount, he would -- he would ease off on the interest rates. and so that was the motive that they had. and the members of the finance committee and i believe it the republicans took upon that as a challenge. and we were -- we put together in 1982 and tefra was mainly the tax piece. but there was a spending cut piece. and it was called the three-legged stool, the famous -- i often talked about the three-legged stool. it was tax cuts and spending cuts and incentives. and volcker cut the interest rates. and it had a remarkable payoff for the country by a terrific cost. and it was a political exe
subject, oral histories, here is an excerpt from an oral history you'd done with -- and it's bob dole talking about george mcgovern. it's only -- it's less than a minute and we can get you both to talk about what role they play. >> he had a very compassionate attitude towards people with whom he disagreed. how else can you explain mcgovern and dole being such good friends? i mean, i used to rail against george mcgovern. today i can't do that anymore because i have such enormous respect for george mcgovern and the genuine -- i'm going to say love and respect between bob and george mcgovern. it's a beautiful friendship and i sat down after the dole announcement in lawrence when they had that big dinner and my wife and i were having a late night snack and george mcgovern came in. and we sat down with him and talked for about an hour-and-a- half. and i just came to see that bob had more influence on him than he had on bob. >> where did you do it and when did you do this? he's now deceased. >> that's right, we did it about three years ago and boy, jack kemp -- we miss jack kemp. jack kemp
. sheila bair, former legal counsel to bob dole, bush appointee, read her this morning. this bill is tighter than you can imagine when it comes to the issue of taxpayers ever again bailing out failed institutions or getting that implicit government guarantee. you're a shareholder you lose money. you're management you get fired. this bill absolutely shuts that door once and for all. nothing could be clearer in this bill than that. >> mr. dodd, the new bill would provide new powers potentially for the fed and another agency that would be able to regulate everything from stock trades to derivatives. would this give the federal reserve too much power? >> no. the federal reserve would have jurisdiction over large bank holding companies of $50 billion or more. we'll also have some regulators over these nonbank banks, the financial institutions that had no regulators and contributed to so much of the economic problem. that's a sweeping reform in this bill and absolutely critical. but we also do away with what is calledash -- arbitrage where companies are shopping for the regulators of l
and ask them to. bob dole was great. we had a real sense of bipartisan mission. we disagreed about whether chemical tags should be put in fertilizer, but as a scientific matter, it is hard to do anyway. we did not abolish all our disagreements, but there was a sense that this is something we had to do together. that is exactly what happened. i propose measures to increase law enforcement officials solely dedicated to fighting terror. eight center to gather every i asked for the approval of military experts who were prohibited from participating in law enforcement to be involved but threats of the involved chemical, biological, or nuclear-weapons. one of law enforcement to be able to attract money trails and have the same rules that apply to organized-crime figures for electronic surveillance apply to terrorists and those selling explosives for use in a terrorist incident. for attacking members of the uniformed services. congress passed this bill in seven weeks with strong bipartisan support. i can tell you that while we had 9/11 and had a lot problems sense, that legislation helped. in my
percent sis, nelson rockefellers, bob dole's, that type of person isn't around anymore. they need moderates within the republican party but not in leadership, these people talking about secession, sounds like nullification and ripping off their lips, not the kind of language you need to bring american together. they talk about bi partnershpar and talk about meeting me at the state line or secession. these aren't the type of words you hear and you don't hear them in congress, impossible to have bipartnership when party says no, no, no and kill the bill. the whole idea of kill the bill was difficult. i was out on the balcony at the capitol and the verbiage and vitriol was so strong, you knew that they want -- they had ill feelings toward anybody that voted for the bill. tempers got so great. i've been to birmingham, montgomery and selma with john lieuwisin the pilgrimage three weeks earlier, we visited the 16th street church when the hate got so much they were bombed and killed and the government oppressed people who tried to start a voting rights march. to see this language and the
a bob dole and told him to stop lying about my record. number seven, the louisiana party went there this week in a web ad which rehashes david vitter's prostitution scandal. vitter still has a wide lead in the polls. six, members of congress who read back the pro fanity laced goldman sachs memos with relish aren't the only ones using spleetatives to get a point across. we thought we should show you the ad. >> the cleanout stop spending is going to take a real [ bleep ]. >> i mean a really big [ muted ] storm. >> cut spending, balance the budget every year, cut property taxes eight times. >> you're talking about bob schiller. >> you said mooutd storm. >> there you go. at number five, arlen specter has earned his reputation as a brass knuckles campaigner. it's closing with ads attacking sestak's military record and the amount he pays staffers. no show joe and no doug joe. remaining in number four, rick snyder's campaign in the michigan governor's race. an effective nod to unconventional smarts has helped him quite a bit. number three, we showed you this tim james english only ad
the first administration to get a bill on the committee. and once i saw william crystal's memo to bob dole, i realized we never had a chance. because we couldn't pass it without five or six republicans. they -- i had an obstacle president obama didn't have. they had an absolute clear filibuster number. that is, they had 45 republican senators, they could have lost four and still defeated me. i felt like teddy roosevelt who have felt if he had been alive in the 1930s. seeing his cousin franklin being able to sign legislation in areas he had advocated. that took two decades and this took less time. i actually -- i was thrilled by it. and worked hard. hillary and i lobbied people all over the weekend before the vote and she and i were ecstatic. it sometimes takes a long time to change a country. and i think, frankly now, they'll keep changing this bill. they'll have to keep working on it, putting more costs drivers in it to take the cost down, but it's a big, big step and a wonderful thing for the country. >> president clinton, thanks so much for joining us. congratulation on the third annive
. nothing could be clearer in the bill. a good republican like sheila bare who heads the fdic appointed bob dole's legal counsel, been at the fdic, a bush appointee. she says it better than everybody. this bill ends too big to fail. nothing could be clearer and my republican friends know that. >> did it take catastrophe or near-catastrophe to get this through the heads of yourself and the other democrats, so that you at least, your party, could at least get it right? it looks like one party's got it right. some members of the other party may be getting it right. you're still hoping to get five or ten republicans to join you? >> the door is still open, chris. i've worked for a year at this my republicans on the committee know that i've reached out, i have signed republicans to work with democrats. on major parts of this bill dealing with the exotic instruments, the consumer issues, as well as the issue of too big to fail in resolution. all of this has been very well worked on. i introduced a bill in november. we changed it. we worked at it. so 24 notion, this is partisan bill, that still all
, five democrats, for republicans, one of which was senator bob dole. they share a history to get it that began in 1987 when a partner in on the project. beginning on the first day, he delivered a short historical vignettes written by mr. baker and his staff highlighting the significant people a memorable event associated with the senate. his devotion is apparent. at the first director, he made great strides collecting and maintaining historical records, recording and publishing histories, i have no blogging photographs burda not intend to preserve history, he worked to make it more accessible to the american public. there were frequent appearances on c-span and a tireless devotion to questions from senators, their staff, historians, and tourists visiting the halls of congress. what many people do not realize is that the records of congress and other files that record how and why legislation came into being are not subject to any overarching legislation regarding the disposition. a center is free to keep or make publicly available those records at his or her discretions. we are lu
comfortably over senator bob dole in 1996. they are simply not good predictive indicators. one historical fact that i would not over-read into, but that is an important qualifier, among elected presidents -- that means elected, not appointed, did not come in because somebody died or something, among elected presidents, only one has lost three -- only one has lost re- election, if they were elected to take over from the other party. that was jimmy carter. i see some really bright, talented people out there. i see some reasonably bright, reasonably talented people. >> we will leave the last moment of this program to go live to hear pope, speaking on entrepreneurship in muslim countries. he is just stepping up to the podium. you are watching live coverage from the ronald reagan building, on c-span. >> in my life, and as president, i have had the great pleasure of visiting many of your countries. i have always been grateful for the warmth and hospitality that you and your fellow citizens have shown. tonight, i appreciate the opportunity to return the hospitality. for many of you, i know this is yo
. you know, the second time he played bob dole, and this time for al gore, i believe he played dubya, so he's very, very good, very sharp. having represented bill clinton and -- and the first lady, the president and the first lady, with their books, and since i'm kind of an equal-opportunity offender in the book, and i point out the president and the first lady spin, as well as other democrats, as well as the republicans -- i hope i'm not talking out of school here -- he thought it was not a product he could properly represent, so he suggested another good friend of mine and his, a fellow by the name of ron goldfarb, who is also excellent, very, very good, very well respected in the industry. and i called ron and told him i had an idea, and he said 'put together a little proposal.' he suggested kind of what i might put in the proposal. i -- i put a proposal together, gave it to him. he liked it, changed it a little bit but finally got a product that he really liked. he took it to new york. there were three publishers that were interested, and they had a little auction. and one of them sa
comfortably over senator bob dole in 1996. just simply not good predictive indicators. and one little historical fact -- and i wouldn't overread this. but -- and there are important qualifiers here. among elected presidents, that means elected, not appointed, didn't come in because somebody died or something. elected presidents who when they took office they took over from the other party, only one of them in the last century -- >> we'll take you live to attorney general eric holder and kathleen sebelius in the health care sector. live coverage. >> secretary sebelius and i made it a top priority for both of our departments to crack down on health care fraud which we know cost taxpayers billions of dollars every year. failure our health care fraud prevention and enforcement action team, better known as h.e.a.t. we have brought the full resources of government of individuals and corporations who divert taxpayer resources for their own game. today we are here to announce the latest results of that effort. the pharmaceutical company has agreed to pay $520 million to federal and state taxp
was stand up and say what's it going to cost us right away in taxes. >> bob dole, bob packwood would have led with the tax argument, mark halperin and lawrence o'donnell has said that over time, as well. that is the potent argument but republicans didn't make it. >> can i take advantage of lawrence's expertise to ask, how are the tax increases divided though? who do they hit in the middle class, lower class or mostly the wealthy? >> they are mostly in the top end. absolutely, the distribution of them is very much on the high end. the difficult -- but there's two things that are here. one is they do not index some of these tax increases. so it's going to work like the alternative minimum tax which was designed for millionaires and now hits the middle class. that's going to happen to these taxes. they're all going to move down overtime in terms of what they call distributional impact. >> they start at $200,000. it's going to go down from there. >> so this is going to impact the middle class just like. >> just as the republicans missed an opportunity on this. lease no question. the president
's what i don't get, i'm reminded of bob dole running for president in '96 asking where is the outrage about stories about bill clinton. we got what? new information on this from scott cohn. let's go to scotty. what have you got, scott? >> let me just read you a little bit from the complaint. the 31-year-old goldman sachs executive who is allegedly at the heart of all of this. january 23rd, 2007, when the upcoming collapse in the housing market was just starting to show up on people's radar. he allegedly is starting to come up with this deal where people will be able, particularly paulson will be able, paulson & company will be able to short these mortgages without knowledge of people they were going to sell the security to. he sends an e-mail, the whole building is about to collapse any time now. this referring to the mortgage market. only potential survivor, the fabulous fab referring to himself. standing in the middle of all these complex trades. and similarly, in february 11th, 2007, the business is dead and we don't have a lot of time left. they have to go forward with this and ac
about these suspects. former senator and presidential candidate bob dole is in the hospital. he is undergoing extensive therapy after knee surgery at walt are reed and preparing for surgery on his other knee . he was in the hospital in february with pneumonia. he is said to be doing great this morning. those are your headlines. >> while you were out for vacation rick was out with the flu. >> i wish i was in the mexico instead of the couch. >> i could have used you for baby sitting purposes. >> you want him. >> flu sounds about perfect right >> you would be better having your babies baby sat with a frog. >> and another absolutely beautiful day. it is important. take a look at video out of rhode island. this week such a rough week. president obama declared disaster areas in rhode island and new jersey after all of the rain caused so much damage in the floods. this is from west warwick, rhode island . it is not an area that is stranger to flooding, but they have got more than they have seen in 200 years. it makes the clean up and better than temperatures for this time of year. that
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